Difference between revisions of "Considering a Track Bike"

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In July of '05 I found a perfect race-prepped SV650.  I made the owner an offer, he accepted.
 
In July of '05 I found a perfect race-prepped SV650.  I made the owner an offer, he accepted.
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== Why a Dedicated Track Bike? ==
 
== Why a Dedicated Track Bike? ==
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My primary goal was to reduce track prep time.  It takes me a few hours to prep my MZ for the track.  In addition to removing turn signals, bag mounts, headlight and taillight I also needed to make sure it had relatively new tires.  This bike serves as a commuted and a tourer and wears sport tires so it tends to get squared tires.  I went through a few track days where I would mount track tires, ride a track day and unmount them for a tour the following weekend.
  
 
== Why an SV650? ==
 
== Why an SV650? ==
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I wanted to say small.  If you ride a small bike you learn to ride fast in turns to keep up with big bikes.  I didn't want to be one of those people that are fast because they know how to use the throttle.
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I wanted a bike that did not have ground clearance issues.
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 +
I did not want an inline 4.  600s are a little bit powerful and bulky for my tastes.  Also, as a rider of singles and twins I am used to engines that produce power lower in the rev range.  I'm just not used to revving and engine to get power out of it.
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Now, an sv650 is a terrible track bike stock.  The suspension is poor, the cheaper naked version had handle bars.  At the very least you need to install clip-ons and upgrade the suspension if you want a decent track bike.  The ideal is to have full race bodywork.
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You are better off looking for an already converted bike.
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I happened upon a full-on race bike.  It has fully set up suspension, worked motor making 90hp at the rear wheel, race carbs, fully bodywork.  It's raw, beautiful and lovely.
  
 
== What Went Wrong? ==
 
== What Went Wrong? ==
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== Streetable.. ==
 
== Streetable.. ==

Revision as of 21:39, 17 April 2006

In July of '05 I found a perfect race-prepped SV650. I made the owner an offer, he accepted.

It's March 1 and the bike is almost ready for the track.

Why a Dedicated Track Bike?

My primary goal was to reduce track prep time. It takes me a few hours to prep my MZ for the track. In addition to removing turn signals, bag mounts, headlight and taillight I also needed to make sure it had relatively new tires. This bike serves as a commuted and a tourer and wears sport tires so it tends to get squared tires. I went through a few track days where I would mount track tires, ride a track day and unmount them for a tour the following weekend.

Why an SV650?

I wanted to say small. If you ride a small bike you learn to ride fast in turns to keep up with big bikes. I didn't want to be one of those people that are fast because they know how to use the throttle.

I wanted a bike that did not have ground clearance issues.

I did not want an inline 4. 600s are a little bit powerful and bulky for my tastes. Also, as a rider of singles and twins I am used to engines that produce power lower in the rev range. I'm just not used to revving and engine to get power out of it.

Now, an sv650 is a terrible track bike stock. The suspension is poor, the cheaper naked version had handle bars. At the very least you need to install clip-ons and upgrade the suspension if you want a decent track bike. The ideal is to have full race bodywork.

You are better off looking for an already converted bike.

I happened upon a full-on race bike. It has fully set up suspension, worked motor making 90hp at the rear wheel, race carbs, fully bodywork. It's raw, beautiful and lovely.

What Went Wrong?

Streetable..